Back in the Shop Again

I had a few good days out in the shop and made some progress on the Hope Chest Project.  The design calls for beads on the framework around each panel. The beads were added to all of the frame pieces using a beading plane and scratch stock. (See previous post) The legs, rails and stiles needed to have mitered corners added so the frames fit tightly together and form the beaded frames. This required removing some material where the tenons fit into the mortises.  I tried a couple of different methods but settled on removing the majority of waste with a crosscut saw and then using a combination of paring chisels and router plane to clean things up.  It is pretty exacting work and everything needs to be just right for everything to fit together perfectly.

The first step was to trim back the corners of the tenon pieces. I used the same jig I used for mortising but added 45 degree cuts to each edge. This enabled me to use a saw to rough cut and then pare right to the edge of the rail face.

Layout:

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Cutting:

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Paring:

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Use the rails to directly transfer the layout lines for the mating leg or stile using a marking knife:

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I found it easiest to make a 90 degree cross cut and then a rip cut to remove the rough waste.
Crosscut:

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Rip cut. Yes I need a larger tenon saw!  I finished the cut with a Japanese flush cut saw that does not have a back.

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The cut was cleaned up using a paring chisel and a flat reference surface…..:

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…and finished up using the miter block as before:

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Here is the final result:

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I do not have a picture of it but I used a series of cross cuts for the joint above and then used a paring chisel to remove most of the waste and a router plane to do the final flattening.  After many joints it was time to do some dry fitting.  I was a little nervous!

 

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3 Comments

  1. Dan

    Just started using a blue spruce marking knife. It’s a beautifully made tool that has just the right balance and feel in use.

    Reply
  2. Bob Finch

    Dave,
    I am enjoying watching your progress. It will be a beautiful heirloom.
    Bob

    Reply

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